Thursday, July 20, 2017

7 Things Flight Attendants Notice About You When You Board A Plane By Suzy Strutner

Flight attendants may seem chipper and carefree, but don’t be fooled: While pouring bubbly and chatting with travelers, these trained first responders are also keeping a close watch over the plane for threats, starting the very moment you board. “Passengers think we are just greeting them at the door,” Jay Robert, a flight attendant and founder of Fly Guy, told HuffPost. “But they’d be surprised at the number of threats we eliminate at that stage of the flight which would have caused a delay or even harmed their health and safety.” We asked flight attendants to name the first thing they notice about passengers when they board a plane. Most of their answers have less to do with judging your in-flight look and more about keeping you safe. The right boarding behavior could score you better service, too. Here’s what the cabin crew notices:

If you look them in the eye.

″[I notice] who makes eye contact with me and who doesn’t. More often than not, the ones who don’t make eye contact make me investigate... Are they scared of flying? Are they feeling okay? Are they dealing with a personal issue? These are things people don’t tell you outright, and a facet of my job is making sure everyone is having a comfortable flying experience.” ― Stephanie Mikel, Southwest Airlines

If you’re drunk.

“Intoxication and aggressive passengers are prime suspects we try to identify at the doors. We are trained in basic taekwondo techniques to handle acts of aggression in the sky, but stopping them before they get up there is our main goal.” ― Jay Robert of Fly Guy

If you’re in shape.

“I’m looking for able bodied persons who can assist with security problems inflight, as well as someone who appears willing and able to assist in an emergency evacuation. Typically, this is someone who is traveling alone and in street clothes, looks like they are in above average physical shape or is known emergency service personnel.” ― Zac Ford, flight attendant with a major carrier

If you talk to them.

“When I say hello and a passenger responds back, I notice and think, ‘wow, that person is really nice.’ If I ever needed help with something, I’ll probably ask the nice passenger. [And] if a passenger ever needs help from me, I’ll probably go above and beyond the call of duty for a nice passenger.” ― Heather Poole, American Airlines

If you’re under the weather.

“It’s important to check if my passengers are fit to fly. Once all doors are closed and we’re airborne, it can get very challenging to handle medical emergencies. During boarding is the perfect time to take a look at who will be on my flight.” ― Claudia Sieweck, TUI fly

If you’re pregnant.

“I’m searching women to see if they are hiding baby bumps with loose clothing. After a certain point in a pregnancy, women need a doctor’s certificate to travel, and after a set period they are no longer allowed to fly.” ― Jay Robert of Fly Guy

If you’re nervous.

“I ask passengers if everything is alright if I have the feeling something isn’t perfect. Passengers with fear of flying get my special attention: I love to care for them and to make them feel comfortable.” ― Claudia Sieweck, TUI fly
Some responses have been lightly edited and condensed for clarity.
This article originally appeared on HuffPostYahoo!

Saturday, July 15, 2017

Ravinia Festival 2017

Photo Credit: Ravinia Festival Lawn/www.ravinia.org
Schedule Photo

Lonely Planet releases 2017 top 10 travel destinations rankings By Darla Guillen

Photo Credit: Toronto, Canada/worldplacez.blogspot.com
The No. 1 country to visit in 2017, according to Lonely Planet, will be Canada, because it's "turning 150 in 2017 and making no apologies for it."

"Canada is always popular with us," Lonely Planet's Canada destination editor Alex Howard said. "But there are several things going on in 2017 that made it number one. It's the country's biggest birthday party in recent memory with the sesquicentennial next year [2017], and they won't be shy about celebrating. Also, international travelers can expect their money to go further due to the weak Canadian dollar, so now is the time to start planning a trip." Chron

Friday, July 14, 2017

Saturday, July 8, 2017

I Can't Stop Smiling At These Dogs Before And After Their Haircuts! By Grace Chon

Before Pup Haircut
Animal photographer named Grace Chon has always found before and after photos from dog grooming to be really funny. So she got the idea to shoot a photo series that highlighted the transformation! Sunny Skyz

After Pup Haircut

Monday, July 3, 2017

A guide to prevent, treat and recover from a host of athletic injuries By Encarnacion Pyle

Physical exercise is great for the mind, body and spirit. And playing a team sport can be good for learning accountability, dedication and building confidence and leadership skills. But participating in athletics isn’t without its risks, whether you’re an elite athlete, a weekend warrior or take an occasional jog or bike ride. Sports medicine experts say that’s why it’s important to learn how to prevent injuries and look beyond your medicine cabinet to treat some of the most common sports injuries. And once you’ve recovered, it’s also good to know how to keep from suffering the same injury again.“A lot of injuries happen within the first few months of a person taking up a new activity,” said Dr. James Borchers, director of sports medicine at Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center. “The last thing we want people to do is to defeat themselves before they even get started.” One way to reduce the risk of this happening is by talking to your doctor about the appropriate level of exercise for your fitness level and abilities, he said. Many injuries occur when people do too much, too quickly. When starting an exercise routine or a new workout program, start slowly, Borchers said. You should gradually build up the intensity, duration and frequency. It’s also important to warm up before and after exercising, stretch regularly and vary your workout so you don’t overuse one set of muscles, said Dr. Sylvia Rozek, a sports medicine doctor at Mount Carmel Fitness & Health. A certified personal trainer, physical therapist or strength/conditioning coach can teach you good techniques and create a safe and realistic exercise program, she said. There are basically two types of injuries: acute and overuse, said Dr. John Diehl, a family practice and sports medicine doctor at OhioHealth’s McConnell Spine, Sport & Joint Physicians group. Acute injuries usually occur after a single traumatic event, such as a twist, fall or collision, Diehl said. They can include broken bones, sprains such as ligament injuries, strains such as muscle and tendon injuries and cuts and bruises, he said. Overuse injuries typically occur over time, when an athletic activity is repeated so often that parts of the body don’t have enough time to heal, he said. Examples include runner’s knee, swimmer’s shoulder and tennis elbow.“Younger athletes are more likely to suffer an acute injury during a sporting event or as a result of a serious accident, while older athletes or weekend warriors are more likely to get an overuse injury,” he said. People should seek medical treatment for serious injuries, but can manage many sports injuries themselves, experts say. Diehl said the RICE method — short for rest, ice, compression and elevation — is helpful. And some sports-medicine experts add a P, for protection. If pain or other symptoms don’t improve, see a doctor or sports-medicine expert. More persistent problems might require rehabilitation, surgery or both, said Dr. Christopher Kaeding, executive director of sports medicine at Ohio State. And don’t let the fear of re-injury become an excuse for giving up exercising or a sport you love, he said. The Columbus Dispatch